Dove Joins Movement To Reduce Beauty Industry’s Environmental Impact

Dove
Photo courtesy Dove

The beauty industry is trash. Literally. We are filling up landfills with more than 120 billion units of packaging produced every year to support our must-have makeup, haircare, and skincare needs. In the U.S. alone, almost 70 percent of that waste is sitting there — and it takes a whopping 1,000 years to decompose. 

That’s why sustainability has gone from a buzz word to a necessity and brands are taking note. 

Dove recently announced that all of its brands — Dove, Dove Men+Care, and Baby Dove — will be made using 100 percent recycled plastic by the end of the year. This will reduce Dove’s annual use of virgin plastic by 20,500 tons globally and reduce CO2 emissions by 27,265 tons per year. The energy savings will be enough to charge 3.4 billion smartphones every year.


Dove Recycle Installation
Photo courtesy Dove

Last month, Dove hosted a special “Proud of What We’re Made Of” installation in NYC’s Grand Central Terminal to highlight the change. Passersby donated a plastic item for recycling and received a Dove Body Wash packaged in the brand’s new bottle made with 100% recycled plastic. The day-long event collected 2,000 plastic items for recycling from consumers.

In addition, single packs of its iconic beauty bar will be completely plastic-free.

The move comes as part of its parent company, Unilever’s, global effort to reduce the amount of virgin plastic in packaging across of all its brands by 50 percent within the next five years.

Other brands within the Unilever company are also moving towards sustainability. Seventh Generation now has a bath and body line that is 100 percent biodegradable and water-friendly and, in April, Love Beauty & Planet will launch new shampoo and conditioner bottles that use 30 percent less plastic and 50 percent less water than the original bottles.

About The Author

Stephenetta (isis) Harmon

isis is a music, hair and communications junkie. she is a Black beauty editor; founder of Sadiaa, the premiere beauty directory for women of color, and editor for HypeHair.com.