Hype Chat: Natalie Paul Talks ‘The Sinner,’ Beauty Must-Haves & More

Natalie Paul

Natalie Paul made headlines when she joined season 2 of the USA Network’s critically acclaimed and Golden Globe-nominated The Sinner. The show is a fan fave and Natalie is a force in her own right. She earned an NAACP Image Award nomination for her role opposite Lakeith Stanfield in 2017’s Crown Heights. 

[SEE ALSO: Hair Treatment: 5 DIY Hair Masks For Healthier Tresses]

Natalie is also known for her work on HBO’s The Deuce as reporter Sandra Washington, Boardwalk Empire and Show Me a Hero along with Netflix’s Luke Cage, and Starz’s Power


We caught up with the rising star to learn more about her journey and her secret to healthy hair!

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HH: Can you share a little bit about how you got your start in the industry?
Natalie Paul:After I graduated from the NYU Tisch graduate acting program, it was like jumping into cold water. I did readings, voiceovers, and some regional theater and just got to meet people.

Eventually, I booked a few episodes on Boardwalk Empire, I played Juliet in Romeo & Juliet with the Classical Theater of Harlem and then Show Me A Hero, where I got to play a leading role. That was an incredible experience, to work alongside Oscar-nominated actors and Paul Haggis, who directed Million Dollar Baby and Crash.

HH: And now you’re on critically acclaimed The Sinner. How was that experience?
NP: This season, The Sinner centers on an entirely new case with a whole new batch of characters. A young couple is murdered by their son in a hotel. The Sinner is more of a whydunit and not a whodunit, and that idea is still present with the new season. Along with the case, we delve deeper into the characters and what motivates them.

HH: And your role? What do you enjoy most about playing this character?
NP: I play local rookie detective Heather Novack, and I call in Detective Ambrose (from last season) to help me with the case..Heather carries a lot of responsibility—she’s the one that has it together in her community; she’s trying to do the right thing, and she’s trying to be a good police officer. I really like that about her, and I relate to that too. But, what I love about her is that underneath the uniform, she carries a lot of depth—a complexity and a softness that she can’t show at work.

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