‘ELLE Canada’ Declares The Dashiki As The Newest “It” Item

Photo Credit: Elle Magazine

Photo Credit: Twitter/@ellecanada

In yet another update of cultural appropriation, ELLE Magazine’s Canadian vertical is stirring up drama with a post it recently published.

According to ELLE Canada, dashikis are the newest “it” item. Yes, the traditional African garb that we’ve all seen before was blasted to their 64.9K followers as new. And of course, when social media got wind of the post, everyone gave the publication side eyes in unison, wondering why they would feed their readers such nonsense; questioning if dashikis were really the new kaftan.

[SEE ALSO: 8 Times Magazines Were Guilty of Trying to Turn Black Trends White]


In the slideshow post, ELLE offers celebrities like Pretty Little Liars star Shay Mitchell, Sarah Jessica Parker, Beyonce, Zendaya Coleman, and Jhene Aiko rocking the item, showing solidarity amongst the masses on a trend that has supposedly now gone widespread.

To be fair, an editor’s note included: “No, dashikis are not new to the world, guys.” The article also gives credit to the dashikis origin: “Originating from West Africa, this tribal printed shirt is on our style radar.”

Even still, the most notable and unfortunate drawback of this entire situation is the fact that their social media coverage of the article was poorly worded. One could easily take their tweet out of context immediately. And as a result, the publication removed the tweet once it became the hot topic of Twitter late yesterday (Aug. 20) afternoon.

Beyoncé in a dashiki

Photo Credit: Instagram.com/beyonce

And, this isn’t the first time ELLE has caught fire for putting their own skin on a piece of black culture and dressing it up for their audience. Their American glossy actually published an online article that claimed that Timberland Boots were the “hot NEW fall fashion trend.”

[SEE ALSO: Dear White People: Full Lips Are Not A New Trend]

What do you think? Is this another case of predominately white publications trying to appropriate or cash in on black culture? Check out the article for yourself here.

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